#Unpacked EP 18: HubSpot Properties

George Thomas:
That's right, Sprocket Talk viewers and listeners, we are live again for this episode of Unpacked. Remington is obviously feeling better. How are you doing fine sir?

Remington Beggs:
I'm feeling better. I'm in the soundproof box so I'm sorry it's not orange in the background, but I got to level out your orange. I can't believe I'm saying that, those words coming out my mouth.

George Thomas:
Right. What's up with that? I don't even know what to do with that, the fact that you're almost complaining about my orange walls behind me.

Remington Beggs:
No complaint, just jealous right now.

George Thomas:
But it does level it out. Yeah, it's funny. The inside of that box should probably be at least an orange stripe or something going on there.

Remington Beggs:
Right, maybe a logo right here.

George Thomas:
There you go. That would be nice. There you go. Remington, today we are talking about HubSpot of course. We are talking about properties. This is really wide open. But the idea of this kind of came about with the thinking that there's a lot of properties out there. We're not even talking custom properties, we're just talking default properties by HubSpot. Really, curious how many people out there are using all of them, some of them, none of them and ones that maybe tickle your fancy, if you will. As we get into this, what is a property that you want to kick this off with?

Remington Beggs:
First off, whenever we talk about properties, people... Whenever we talk about HubSpot, no one ever says that they really love properties.

George Thomas:
Right. Right.

Remington Beggs:
But it's like what HubSpot is. When we are having the conversation and we're like, "What are we going to do next?" I'm like, "Wait, what have we really touched on?" What's interesting is everything we've touched on has to do with properties, but we haven't talked about properties themselves. I think it's only relevant to give at least one episode to properties. One of the properties that I think people don't use when they get started with HubSpot is really focusing on the original source and the original source drill down one and two because there's a gold mining of info that that's there and allows for you to really know who's in your database and where they came from and that's before you even add any custom properties yourself. Original source shows social, paid... social, paid, email marketing, that kind of thing and then they drill down one and two.

Remington Beggs:
Literally, if you had a HubSpot UTM or a Google UTM parameter, it's going to be like campaign and then add group or additional source info. Those three really allow for you to get a very specific picture for your automation. It's really, really valuable.

George Thomas:
Yeah, I love that. It's funny because we could come at this of like, "We love all the properties because you're right. I listened to you talk at the very beginning and it's HubSpot is about lead intelligence. Lead intelligence is only there because of properties. Remington, one of the things that I like to do when it comes to the lead intelligence and the properties that we have is be able to pay attention to historical things that have happened and therefore make some assessments or assumptions or some goals based on that historical data. For instance, one of the properties that is in there is days to close. What days to close does is it looks at from the time that a contact was created to the time that they were closed as a customer and it'll tell you 18 days, 23 days, 57 days.

George Thomas:
It depends on your sales cycle people. I don't know how many days it takes, but what's nice is you can get a list of customers. You can look at that days to close property inside of your list and now you can start to look at like, "Oh man, I can easily see the average days to close. It's 72 days. Cool." Now, what you do with that information, that property, that data, that intelligence, is up to you. Is there a way that we can make it fewer days? Is there a group that it's longer and we notice there's certain content that they didn't see, but these other people who close faster in 52 days saw these pages and attended this webinar. Well what does that mean? Strategy people? That's what it means. Remington, what's another property that you would say you want to pull out of the mass amount that we have to talk about today?

Remington Beggs:
Another one that... A lot of times, people have a big issue with the last touch source. With last touch... And this is a field you'd have to create and it should be a hidden field, but what... A lot of times, and this is again me getting super nerdy about this stuff, you'll have the original source, right? That original source will be based off of that lead source and those other fields I mentioned just a minute ago. But what you can do is you can create a field for every... or a property rather for every UTM parameter that you usually see in a campaign. The internal ID has to be the same. It could be UTM content, UTM campaign and that type of thing. You could report off of that just like you could report off of lead source or original source. That's probably one of my favorite because marketers don't get enough credit for what influences the last touch of a close, right?

Remington Beggs:
We don't know how many people... I'm going through this with a client that I'm meeting with tomorrow. They're like, "Remington, we just haven't really seen the original source come through of the work that you guys are working on." But yet, 90% of their customers have been influenced by at least 12 emails we've written over the past six months. Right?

George Thomas:
Right.

Remington Beggs:
There's some conversations, but also what if none of your people are actually coming through on stuff you're recently doing? What if you're brand new? What if you're brand new to a company... brand new to a HubSpot portal, we'll just put it that way, and you want to start showing result of the last touch. If any one of those people who existed in the system come to your site and fill out a form, those fields have to be present in order to really attribute that last touch because it'll show up in reporting, but it won't show up in conversions. If you have the UTM content, essentially what you do is HubSpot, super smart in how they do this, if you go to a landing page that has those UTM parameters I'm talking about in it and you have hidden fields on your forms that are these fields, it'll overwrite those fields every single time, which is exactly what you want it to do because then it's going to always show you the last attribution; source, content, ad, whatever stuff you care about.

George Thomas:
Love it. Love it.

Remington Beggs:
I just got up on a pedestal for a minute there.

George Thomas:
You are preaching it there for a hot minute brother. I'm just going to throw that out there. It's funny because you're talking about closing deals in time... closing there a little bit as you were going through that. That got my mind thinking of the property that I don't know if a lot of people use, which by the way HubSpot says that it's enterprise only, but I was in a professional portal, did a search for it. Shh. It came up. Don't tell anybody. I'm just going to throw this out there, but likelihood to close. What that does is it looks at behavior, it looks at properties and it says within the next 90 days, these are people who are likely to close. If you're trying to do some type of like, "Hey, what do I got in the pipeline? What's coming up next? What could I work a little bit harder than maybe the rest of this?" using that property likelihood to close would definitely be a good thing for you.

George Thomas:
The other property, Remington, while I'm here, contact priority. That one also, shh, in a professional portal when I did a search for it, showed up. Hey, it is what it is until they figure it out and turn it off, which luckily this is only in the Sprocket Talk community after we're done being live so they ain't going to hear from us. But if it's there in your portal, use those too while you can for sure because they give you some very interesting data. Remington, what is next for you that you think of when you think of contact properties. Or actually, you know what, I'm going to... Hang on, hang on. I keep saying contact properties, but Remington, it could be company properties, it could be deal properties, it could be ticket properties. What property do you want to pull out next?

Remington Beggs:
Yeah, before I talk property, I'm going to throw another one in there is the different types of properties because they're very important and there's very... Especially if you're thinking about it from a reporting standpoint versus just contact information and that kind of thing, so you got to be intentional about it. I know that there are some updates to the properties section of the settings, which I've gotten to see some insights in and it is going to be too legit to quit. Everyone is going to be super stoked and happy. But the different types, single check box. That is literally a checkbox that you can... It's either on or off. What's great about single check box is this can be something that makes it easy for your sales team to click but not have control and access to workflow for instance. Right?

Remington Beggs:
Multiple check boxes are exactly what they sound like. You can have multiple options so it's not either or, it's a check all that apply. For a Sprocket Talk listeners we have like, "Which hub do you use?" You could select all of them. Great for reporting. You've got date picker. It's great if you want to ask someone their birthday for the record. You have file, which is awesome. On the front end, it's going to be an upload, but internally it's going to be a link into your file manager. If someone's uploading their logo, for instance, you have a number, which I don't think I have to explain that one. It's a number. It's a decimal.

George Thomas:
Oh, is it numbers?

Remington Beggs:
It's a number. Yeah. Yeah.

George Thomas:
Are there numbers in there?

Remington Beggs:
Yep.

George Thomas:
Okay.

Remington Beggs:
You got a radio select, which is like the multiple check boxes except it's a singular item.

George Thomas:
I have to stop you there.

Remington Beggs:
Yeah.

George Thomas:
For years, I thought it was radial. Is it radial or radio?

Remington Beggs:
Radio button. Radio button.

George Thomas:
See, I'm insistent.

Remington Beggs:
I mean, radial... You got radial like the circle, but no radio.

George Thomas:
Yeah. Yeah. Anyway.

Remington Beggs:
Throwing in extra L's there. Dropdown select, which is going to work a lot like the radio button. The dropdown select is going to be literally a drawer that drops down. You got single line text, which is what you use for first name, multi-line text, which is like tell us your problems. Some of my favorites here, calculation. Imagine an Excel calculation. It's only available in enterprise portals, but you can calculate number fields so you have to have a number field I just talked about if you want to calculate. We have score, which is similar to the calculation, but score is available to pro users as well. It allows for you to do a lead score or a marketing score or a how awesome are you score, however you look at it. You have HubSpot user, which is going to allow a dropdown for association of any user in your HubSpot portal.

Remington Beggs:
These can be used. And the combination of these being used are so powerful. That's a big one. All right.

George Thomas:
Yeah.

Remington Beggs:
I was going to say something else but now I'm going to let you talk for a minute 'cause I need a breath.

George Thomas:
It's funny because you kind of went sideways then... other than talking about the properties in themselves. I'll go sideways with you. I'll do this little dance with you. I love the fact that you can create property groups because you're going to have all of HubSpot's default and they've got their default property groups. But as you create custom properties with all the things that Remington just talked about, you can quickly turn your property section of your portal into a hot mess. Real quick.

Remington Beggs:
Very quick.

George Thomas:
If you're going to have a bunch of like survey question things, maybe there's a surveys property group. If you're going to have different things for... or different goals or strategies, maybe it's to deal with social, right, maybe it's to deal with the website, maybe it's... whatever, you're going to want to block those out. Now you can quickly go to those sections when you're building a form or when you're trying to get back to those properties, so property groups. But Remington, I'm going to go ahead and also mention a property. Darn it, I wish that I didn't feel like I had to mention this property. I wish I could just say everybody gets it. Everybody uses it. There's no reason... What's up, Dan Sullivan. Glad to see you here today. There's no reason to bring up this property. I wish, I wish, I dream of a day where we could have a properties unpacked episode that I wouldn't have to bring this up.

George Thomas:
However, I go into so many portals and this property is still not being used or it's not being used properly or they don't understand the power in which you have if you use this property. Remington, can you take any guesses what property I'm actually talking about?

Remington Beggs:
First name.

George Thomas:
No. Yeah, for sure.

Remington Beggs:
Persona. Persona. [crosstalk 00:14:02].

George Thomas:
Yeah. Yes, there you go. First of all, let's go sideswipe. If you're not asking first name and making it mandatory, just don't do personalization really or make sure you have a I know their name and I don't know their name list. But yes, Remington, I was talking about persona. The fact that people get all bogged up on creating these humongous personas and persona stories and because they get bogged down, they don't get them in and they don't realize it's like the foundational piece of segmenting their database for the right conversation with the right people at the right time. When they are creating the response for how somebody would say who they are is all jacked up. Nobody's even going to connect with that on a human level at all because they don't use the words I am a, right. Like I am a marketer at a mid company or I'm a CEO or owner of whatever, enterprise company.

George Thomas:
There'll be like almost robotic. CEO, CFO. You're like, "No, nobody's going to click on it. Nobody wants to associate with that." Here's the other thing. When they do use personas, Remington, they don't talk about negative personas. They don't talk about the people that they don't want to do business with so that they can do better business with the people that they do want to do business with. They're not using... Yeah, rewind that and listen to it one quick time. I'm just going to throw you out there. It probably worked. I don't know, maybe it didn't. But the idea is positive personas, negative personas, streamlining the creation of the persona and understanding the power of being able to ask a question, how would you best describe yourself and then being able to say, "I am a...." and select it and now you being able to have a really good conversation and a starting point for what is even second smart questions.

George Thomas:
I won't get into it. People, dang it, use personas. Okay. Hang on, I'll get off my soap box. So Remington, what property would you say next that you would want to unpack here today?

Remington Beggs:
I think we're going to do personas on the next episode of Unpacked because I just saw some fire.

George Thomas:
Oh man, I get fired up bro when it comes to that. It's just, it's terrible.

Remington Beggs:
We got [Suso Tormo 00:00:16:18]. Congrats on the excellent content guys. Thank you. You're the reason, well not just you, but a lot of people like you, the reason why we do this in the first place.

George Thomas:
Absolutely.

Remington Beggs:
When we dig in... I'm going to jump into deal properties for a second. Now, this is an enterprise... This is an enterprise property, but I'm going to say this because you can still do a lot of this using the other additions of the tool if you create these fields. In enterprise, you have recurring revenue reporting, right? Now, recurring revenue reporting has to come from content fields. A lot of times, people turn on recurring revenue reporting, but they don't actually read the three lines of text underneath it when you press the button. There's four additional fields that are added. you have recurring revenue amounts, recurring revenue deal type, recurring revenue inactive date and a recurring revenue inactive reason. The combination of those four fields show you how much recurring revenue retention you have in reporting, but it's fields that you have to set up in a workflow in order to fill out.

Remington Beggs:
For instance, deal amounts will not automatically drop into recurring revenue amounts because your deal amount could be for $100,000, but the recurring revenue amount could be $10,000 a month for 10 months. Right. There's some automation that you can do in there or there's just, you have to add those to your favorites, if you will. But those fields are really, really powerful when you start thinking about recurring revenue businesses, especially for our friends in SaaS or any insurance or anybody that really relies on recurring revenue. It's a huge, a huge thing. That's like a bundle of deal fields. But think about deals too, there's a lot of information you could store in there. Sometimes I think people forget... throw it all in the contact.

George Thomas:
Yeah, yeah. You started out by saying that was enterprise level, right?

Remington Beggs:
Yeah.

George Thomas:
Yeah. Because as you're telling the story, I immediately thought of a client that I'm like, "Oh. Oh, nevermind," Because dang it, sometimes I get frustrated that there's these different things for different levels, but I get it. I get it. It's frustrating.

Remington Beggs:
What's interesting, it's frustrating, but at the same time... I actually talked to a couple of HubSpot execs about this. Obviously, there's some value that they want to make sure comes on the enterprise portion of the tools, but it's also an easy way to test use case because it's not the masses of the entire group. They could deploy a feature to enterprise. They're also people that are typically going to use those features. I mean, you're talking about the persona field, which is pretty basic and people don't even use it. What are the odds of deploying it to basic or pro and people actually using recurring revenue? Probably not that high.

George Thomas:
Well, but here's the thing. Anything that deals with money.

Remington Beggs:
Sure.

George Thomas:
If it's dealing with your wallet, you should probably have it at your fingertips to be able to use it. I'm just going to say that, but I get it.

Remington Beggs:
Could and should. Could and should. Two different things.

George Thomas:
Totally. Two different things.

Remington Beggs:
So yeah, go ahead.

George Thomas:
Yeah. Okay. Remington, I have a question for you. Do you like to pair things? For instance, do you like there's a certain wine with steak or there's a certain wine with fish or maybe there's a certain coffee with a cigar or a scotch with a cigar. Do you typically pair things in your life?

Remington Beggs:
Sure. Wine, rum, beer.

George Thomas:
Yeah. Rum with Coke.

Remington Beggs:
Steak.

George Thomas:
Rum with ice. I get it. Here's the thing. I don't know if many HubSpot users actually go into properties with the mindset of pairing them together to make them more powerful. What I'm alluding to here is life cycle stages and lead status, being able to understand where people are because HubSpot puts a property in place, lifecycle stages that you can't change; subscriber, lead, marketing qualified lead, sales qualified lead, opportunity, customer, other, evangelists... I forgot one. Right? Those are set. So you know that you'd have these milestones, if you will, as people are going through your flywheel or funnel, whichever way you still think about it. But in between those milestones, there should be segments or areas or pieces that you're able to pay attention to. Knowing that you can leverage your lead status and customize lead status, this might be be where you put your bad fit client and you click bad fit and everybody that's a bad fit goes into a bad fit list. You can clean your database of all your bad fit leads by using that lead status. Or maybe it...

George Thomas:
There's also in there like a good, better, best, right? It's this person, they're a lead. They have these three properties, this job title. They deal with this kind of company so they're a better lead, right? Now you've got a lead that's better or a lead that's best or a marketing qualified lead that's good. Being able to combo lifecycle stages and lead status in a place where you take what is sometimes the messy middle... Everybody knows what a lead is. They filled out a form. Everybody knows what a customer is. They gave us money. But in between that, sometimes it gets real gnarly. Being able to use those two paired and be really smart about how you customize lead status, it's just a super smart way to think about navigating that flywheel or funnel and your contacts going through it.

Remington Beggs:
Lead status... And I also liked the idea of deal status too. Status. Sorry, I went British for a minute.

George Thomas:
You did. You was like Charlie Chaplin.

Remington Beggs:
Taking some of that logic goes the same way because you get into deals and you have deal stages, but you might have some different... You might slice them this way for the deal pipeline stages, but you might want to slice them this way for the status of everything. Another field that I want to make sure people understand is... Well, there's two.

George Thomas:
Go ahead.

Remington Beggs:
I have to make sure I... Last activity date is a field that drives me bonkers because clients start using this on us and it's like, "No, that's actually your metric," right? Last activity date is a sales/service metric.

George Thomas:
Yes.

Remington Beggs:
It's not the last time they read a marketing email, right, or anything like that. It's the last time that there was a note on the contact record or there was a a task created or a task completed or an email logged or a meeting booked. Those are last activity dates. It's sitting there in just in solitude in your contact fields. And a lot of times people create lists on that. "Oh, if someone's like gone to my website in the past five days, it should show up." It's only sales activities, sales/service activities, depending how your team is structured. So that's that.

Remington Beggs:
The other one that I want to make sure that we put out there is subscription types and unsubscribes, right?

George Thomas:
Yeah.

Remington Beggs:
Because this is another area that we all get hung up. I actually like it when people unsubscribe from certain things because it's a feedback loop that I get to understand value of content. The issue that sometimes people run into is we create a list... I've done this right. I create a list of anyone who's unsubscribed from all. Well, that's not everyone. How many people signed up to get Sprocket Talk Unpacked and unsubscribed from everything or how many people unsubscribed for just Sprocket Talk Unpacked. I want to be able to know that. It's important to know as you create your unsubscribe lists based on those fields, that for every subscription type... Ad what I mean by that is every blog, every blog list that you have, all the different blogs you have in your blog tool, every subscription type that you create is going to show up and be available as its own independent field. Because I can unsubscribe from one blog but not everything. Of course, there's that unsubscribed from everything.

Remington Beggs:
The reason I bring this up, if I press the unsubscribe from everything, it does not say that I unsubscribed from Sprocket Talk Unpacked. If I click unsubscribe from everything, it does not say that I unsubscribed from Sprocket Talk Unpacked. I'm saying that twice on purpose because people will say, "Oh, I want to know everyone that unsubscribed from one thing," but the unsubscribe from all does not report down. It's just one of those things to pay attention to. If you're creating your lists or you're doing reports, build it off of lists and see which of those fields people are unsubscribed on or two. Also remember that every single one of those subscription types is also in your subscription preferences page. Alright, I'm done now. That was a lot.

George Thomas:
I love it. It's funny, we've been talking about properties and we should just throw in here real quick that you can actually hide properties inside your forms to trigger some really cool actions. For instance, I talked about life cycle stage. You could actually hide that and say make them a marketing qualified lead or the sales qualified lead or an evangelist or whatever, or a customer so then you know not to report on that thing because they're already a customer or they're becoming a customer. Whatever. I love using hidden fields and I don't know if enough people use it. But Remington, my last one, because we do have about four minutes left here for this live Unpacked episode. My last one here is typically a barren wasteland. The deserts of all deserts, if you will. When I typically go into these portals and start to help people... I think it's because it's considered complex. I think it's because it's considered heavy lifting. Right. I think that it's the way that it is because people just don't understand the importance, right? It's complex. It's a heavy lift. People don't understand the importance of it. Remington, any guesses what property I might actually be talking about here?

Remington Beggs:
I have no idea.

George Thomas:
Yeah. HubSpot score, baby.

Remington Beggs:
Oh, okay.

George Thomas:
Here's the thing, there are so many portals that I go into.

Remington Beggs:
Makes sense now.

George Thomas:
And yeah and there is zero lead scoring or you can see that somebody went in and made a halfhearted, three or four rule, attempt to do-

Remington Beggs:
Because they took that certification.

George Thomas:
Boom. Exactly. To do some lead scoring, but never followed through. And folks, listen. There's a whole thing that I love the teach on engagement and using the HubSpot score, but it only works if you've got a matrix, a lead scoring matrix... Speaking of which we need to get ours out to the Sprocket Talk community, but a lead scoring matrix that you can use to understand the rules in which the game that you're playing when it comes to your scores and what your team should be doing at those scores. But also, it only works if you put the scores in. What I mean by that is going through your past content, your past forms, your past emails and giving the opens and the clicks and the downloads and the filled out numbers to actually go with it. Might I just add too, the reason it's a heavy lift, Remington, is because it's an afterthought.

George Thomas:
People will be... It should be an onboarding... It's funny. I keep going back to this whole onboarding thing, but lead scoring should be an onboarding-

Remington Beggs:
Activity.

George Thomas:
Activity that they're forced to do because here's why becomes a heavy lift is there are three months, six months, a year, a couple years in and all of a sudden they're like, "Oh, well we should measure this." And then they think of the 12 eBooks and 20 webinars and 700 emails and they're like... That never works. But if from day one you looked at lead scoring as part of what you do when you build an inbound marketing campaign, you build the CTA, you build the ebook, you build the landing page, you build the form and you score the items. You build the emails and you score the items, then it's not a heavy lift. You should be using HubSpot score. You should be doing lead scoring. If you're not, well-

Remington Beggs:
Start.

George Thomas:
Start. That's what I'm going to say.

Remington Beggs:
All right. My final one is company properties. But to your point of having multiple... And I realize, I'm going to make this quick, right? We've got this one for one. People think of of those properties as a binary thing. Companies technically are looking at customers, especially in the B2B space as like... George, you and I work at the same company. We technically both become customers when I purchase something in the HubSpot reporting.

George Thomas:
Yep.

Remington Beggs:
Right?

George Thomas:
Yep.

Remington Beggs:
They can really mess up your reports if you think that you are actually doing twice as good as is actually fact. One of the things that you can do is you can create a primary point of contact field in your contact record. It's a single checkbox like I talked about. And you can have a has primary point of contact in the company record, which is also a single check box. What you can do is if a new contact is created and you leverage the number of contacts in company is less than two, you can say primary point of contact. What that's going to do is it's going to make it so that if you pull a report and you want to see how many singular companies are being logged as customers, you'll now be able to reference how many people who are primary point of contact are now customers. It allows for you to clean up your reporting, get some real data and it also allows for you to only send emails to people who matter rather than the 47 people that onboarded with your company as you go.

Remington Beggs:
Because remember, every single one of those people... We've got 14 people at Impulse Creative. Those 14 people become customers as soon as they're carbon copied in an email. You just want to be really sure that you're marketing to the right people at the right time because Joe Bob, Jim Bob isn't going to know you if he just got CC'd on something and you haven't built a relationship. Primary point of contact is probably one of my favorite things and you can do that at the company and also the contact level.

George Thomas:
Was it Joe Bob Jim Bob?

Remington Beggs:
Yeah, Joe Bob Jim Bob. He's my best friend.

George Thomas:
Joe Bob Jim Bob. I hope we see you at Inbound 2019. all right folks, that's another episode of Sprocket Talk Unpacked, where we unpacked a few, just a little bit of the properties and power that you have in HubSpot. If you have questions, obviously you can always reach out to us. He's Remington Begg. I'm George B. Thomas. Remington, any final words of wisdom before we head out for today?

Remington Beggs:
No, this has been fun. I think we need 14 more unpacks on properties. That's really kind of how my head's feeling right now, but what was the one we're going to do next week?

George Thomas:
You said personas.

Remington Beggs:
Personas. I think we should do personas next week.

George Thomas:
Because I got fired up.

Remington Beggs:
Yeah, we got fired up and I didn't even talk on that one so this sounds like fun.

George Thomas:
Awesome. Well, we will see you all next week.

Remington Beggs:
Tootles.

George Thomas:
That's what I was waiting for actually was the Tootles.