#Unpacked EP 20: Sales Tools

George:
All right, Remington. Guess what? Guess what? Guess what?

Remington Begg:
It's time.

George:
It's time for Sprocket Talk Unpacked, and it's also one week away. One week away from INBOUND, and not even really. Well, yes, close enough. Close enough to a week. Next Tuesday we will be knee-deep into the INBOUND goodness. So that's some fun stuff. So how are you doing today, fine sir?

Remington Begg:
I'm doing really good. There's a lot of INBOUND goodness this year and it's fun because I've heard the quote a couple of times, "Hard work pays off." We are, I can't wait to do the Sprocket Talk Unpacked with audience participation. So anyone that's listening here that is going to INBOUND. What is that, is that the fifth? The fifth, I think.

George:
I do believe it's the fifth. Yeah.

Remington Begg:
Yep.

George:
3:45 or something like that. Yeah, you can look it up. It's officially on the agenda.

Remington Begg:
Yeah.

George:
Sprocket Talk Unpacked. It's amazing dude, and you're speaking twice. I'm speaking once.

Remington Begg:
Yep, but you'll have a big room.

George:
Yeah. Well, it is what it is, but that is not why the viewers are here today. They want to know about sales tools, we're unpacking sales tools. We kind of went general just to see where our mind would go. We had done marketing and personas and stuff lately. So, Remington, when you think of HubSpot and you think of the sales tools, where does your mind immediately go?

Remington Begg:
Automate the menial. So we have, you're like, "What?" So when I'm thinking about that, I immediately go to this, we want salespeople to produce higher outputs, to increase their sales, or their conversion rates, or the whatever they've got, and right now companies go straight to how many meetings they should have. It should be what kind of outputs do they have? Not necessarily how many inputs do they have. We're doing a bunch of stuff around deal based automation, which I think is amazing, and stuff like that. So look at how you can create the right checks and balances, but using the automation can be really huge. It could be as simple as a notification going to billing to bill someone, or it could be as complicated as setting up the right types of reminders and stuff, and tying that into reporting. But I think automation is one of the more overlooked items when we're talking about like, I would say platform automation rather than task automation, if that makes sense.

George:
That does make sense. So I'm going to throw out there one that I usually don't talk about. I'm pretty sure if I'm thinking of this correctly it is an enterprise feature. You're like the Ninja when it comes to that. You're like, "Enterprise, pro." And I'm like, "Oh, okay, okay." But I'm going to go very sort of beginner yet high level but process, and that is the fact of having sales playbooks and being able to create a playbook, multiple playbooks for scenarios where people are actually trying to do something. I'll tell you why I'm thinking of this, Remington, is because processes are important. More important than that is documented processes. Earlier today I Slacked you and I'm like, "Dude, I don't remember how to launch this new course that we're launching inside of Sprocket Talk, one-to-one personalized video." However, if I had a playbook or a documented process, I could rinse and repeat that. So it started getting me thinking about talking about sales tools today and it's like, you know what? This is why sales teams need repeatable processes, why they need playbooks, why we should get very granular in those playbooks with texts to certain videos or documents, and really just help them be the best that they can be with the sales playbooks.

Remington Begg:
Yes.

George:
Yeah. Right. Amen. I'm just saying.

Remington Begg:
So when we're thinking about playbooks, so playbooks are actually, we're not literally talking about a playbook, like you pull open a big binder and the whole team's playing a game, but what we are doing is we're talking about, it's an Enterprise Sales Hub feature for the record, playbooks, but it's putting in the scripts, if you will, for the right questions. It's allowing a scripted kind of notepad. So I love from a structural point of view that that's there. For me, one of the big pieces I love about the Sales Hub in general is the ability for sequences and templates. We talked about some of these way back when, when we were saying to get the most out of all the features, but a sequence is one thing and a template is another. They're very, very intertwined. Where sequences are going to be a time delay drip, but it's so much different than a workflow, which a workflow for my point, for most points is a company, now a ticket, or a contact, marketing contact like action.

Remington Begg:
Now you've got the sequences. So a sequence is more of like I'm sending a one-off email to George saying, "Hey, just to remind you, we're going to meet in two weeks." And you have a two week follow-up kind of thing. That's super important. You can craft the message but then you can also modify the message. It's so funny because even Jackie, shout out to Jackie on the Impulse team, she goes, "I know. We tell our clients all the time that not everything is the same." But then there is a lot that's the same. This gives you that ability to start with a lot that is the same, but then customize it so it's different. I think that different is really important, but a lot of times people get stuck that you're going to template, templatize my life, and it's like, "No, we're going to templatize your life." It's going to be easy for you. So the sequences and the email templates are humongous.

Remington Begg:
Yeah.

Remington Begg:
So without a doubt sales, but it doesn't mean it's binary, that marketing is not important. Right. I think marketing's job is to be, and how we have it structured at Impulse, marketing and sales are on one team, it's called the revenue team. So we don't talk about is that marketing or is that sales? It's a revenue team function. I think that the job of sales or marketing is acquisition, and that's acquisition of new people, that's acquisition of new dollars and stuff like that. So you can't have marketing without sales in one way, shape, or form. If you're a B2B, it's almost always going to be human interaction, but also leaning into this opportunity to allow self-service, but that's still sales. It's just not sales as we know.

George:
Yeah. So I'm going to answer this in a little bit of a different direction.

Remington Begg:
He's like, "Marketing."

George:
No, no, no, no, no, no, no. No, no, no. Without it, no. I'm going to say too, what is more important, sales or marketing? I wish that there wasn't sales or marketing, or sales and marketing. I really wish that companies would disband that and understand everybody has a task to do and that it's a revenue team. That the people are always trying to drive more revenue to the company, whether that's through attracting new faces, or communicating with existing faces or just really paying attention to how to just nurture and squeeze out every ounce of brand humanness, empathy, you know what I mean? People get stuck in these dang silos and I just, I want it to be one thing, man. I want it to be a revenue team and I want people to rock and roll.

George:
So with that said though, we're going to go into the silo of sales tools and talk more about sales tools. Which is crazy, but it is what it is. So here's the one that I definitely don't want to leave laying around and not talk about is, if you're not using tasks, if you're not putting things in place either manually using them or automagically making them happen in your HubSpot portal, then you're going to end up losing, you're going to drop the ball. The thing too, what I love about HubSpot and tasks is a couple of things. One, you can have task queues. So if you want to get through some things and kind of, because there's this magical thing of doing things in bulk, right? So when I do videos, I bulk shoot my videos, I bulk edit my videos. If I'm writing scripts, I want to write two, three scripts at a time.

George:
Same thing with sales. If you're calling people, call five or six people, and if you're emailing people then email five or six people but get in the mode, get your mojo, your juice, right? So you can have those tasks queues. But also I like that HubSpot will warn you, and I love that they use bright red, like, "Error, error, error, task not done in time." Right? So you can filter tasks. What do I need to get done? What, can I wait? Then from a sales manager perspective, being able to filter by the actual people that you have under you. So if you're a sales manager and you got Jimmy, Betty and Chuck, and you're trying to figure out who got junk done or didn't, it just makes it really nice. It makes it really nice.

Remington Begg:
Yeah. So one of the things that I think, and for our international viewers and listeners, I know there's a lot of talk about they're taking the calling feature out of the platform as we know it, like the web side of it, but the ability for that task queue that you brought up in batching things is really, really important. I think one of the things that the HubSpot CRM and the Sales Hub together do really well, and I do talk about those two things as two separate things. There is not a paid CRM. There is a CRM and then there are paid tools that kind of add on to that. The ability to do those task queues, but actually having task types as calls is amazing, right?

George:
Yeah.

Remington Begg:
And we're doing, we're about to do an implementation for a pretty large company, and one of the things they're saying is like, "We want our team to know when to follow up with things and how to follow up with things." And what's amazing when you think about those call queues and those playbooks that you mentioned, is we can set up those call queues and you can tell a salesperson or a BDR, whomever, the actions for to block out an hour in the morning, right? Or an hour in their afternoon, whatever's most effective, and literally you bust through those call queues and then you press one button and it automatically takes you to the next contact record, and you can see the notes from the task, and you can write notes about the call, and I think what's really incredible about that is it aligns all those vectors, and yet it's something that people don't think they should or could automate. But if you're having trouble getting your salesperson to actually make some phone calls, get them into a call queue and say, "Hey, I need you to do these 15 calls over the next hour." Right?

George:
Yeah.

Remington Begg:
And just roll with it, and to your point, you'd be able to report on that and see that, and it keeps that what I would say velocity going. I think it works really well.

George:
Yeah, it's funny, my brain goes to meeting types and reporting for some reason as you're talking about that, but, but I want to talk about a sales tool that I don't think anybody has ever talked about as a sales tool inside of HubSpot.

Remington Begg:
[crosstalk 00:13:18].

George:
So this is one reason that I love HubSpot, is because they give us tools and they label them sales, and marketing, and we've had the whole silo conversation, but a tool is a tool, and if you can use it to achieve what you want to achieve, then do so. So I'm going to go back to that I said sales playbooks and you said, "Yes, that is an enterprise Sales Hub feature." However, here's another feature inside of HubSpot that isn't enterprise that you could actually leverage to build out a sales playbook, marketing playbook, service playbook, and that is HubSpot projects.

George:
HubSpot projects will allow you to build out the steps in which you want people to do things. Once you build that out, you can put links, and descriptions, and attach files, and all sorts of stuff in projects, and then what's nice is you can take that and turn it into a template. So now every time you're onboarding a new customer, your team could grab the onboarding customer playbook out of a project, flip it into a new project and roll with it. So look, it's called projects. They built it thinking of project management, web dev design, that type of thing, right? Or inbound marketing, like you're going to a trade show, here's the seven things you should do to make it inboundy, but that doesn't mean that you can't use it, reverse engineer it to make some type of playbook or plan of attack for your team to be the best that they can be in any of these micro or macro processes that you have. HubSpot projects, the number one sales tool that isn't a sales tool. Just going to throw that out there.

Remington Begg:
Yeah, I don't know where you pulled that from, but works.

George:
You liked it?

Remington Begg:
I mean, it does. Yeah, totally does. So I think-

George:
Hey, by the way. Right here buddy.

Remington Begg:
Yeah, in your head.

George:
Out of right here.

Remington Begg:
So a couple cool things that I know are coming down the pipe are going to be related to those sequences. So I have to put a PSA here because you can bulk sign up people for sequences. So you can select a list of people and then send out a blanket message, but with great power, with great power comes great responsibility.

George:
Preach it, brother.

Remington Begg:
Don't be that guy.

George:
Or gal.

Remington Begg:
Or gal. So make sure you're being helpful and customized before you start blasting that message, but that being said, if you have really good lists and really good segments, for instance, you could create a filter of contacts of people that have visited your website today, and you could say, "Hey, I saw you, you came to our site today and had a question. I'd love to answer it." Right? You could come across and make a really short and simple, don't say, "Hey, let's book a meeting." Let's actually have a conversation. I know it's a crazy thought, but you could use filters and those sequences to do some really amazing stuff when you start thinking about that one-to-one conversation rather than the one-to-many. But the templates and the bulk adding of sequences, you have to select them before you'll see the button, but you can create that filter, those contacts and roll with that. Again, I'm back on the sequence bandwagon, but it's super, super important.

George:
Yup. Yup. It's funny too because you're like pseudo talking about targeting and the right conversation. I went to conversations over consulting, solving, overselling, but anyway. Just throwing that out there. So, Remington, it's funny because when we entered into this conversation a couple months ago, we started talking about different sales tools, and everybody wants to roll off all these like different individual things, but I got to be honest with you, the number one sales tool is the CRM in itself. We have to remember that this is a part of a bigger machine and yet we never stop to think about the CRM part of the structure of our contacts, being able to filter our contacts, being able to create lists from our contacts, being able to have lead intelligence, and that's where I want to go right there.

George:
If you're watching this and you're a sales professional, or might I say a revenue team professional, and you're not using lead intelligence before and after the sell of a service, product, or process that you provide. In other words, have you solved somebody's problem and you haven't learned anything about them before, or are not paying attention and learning after for upsales or resells. I just don't even know. It has to be ingrained in your blood. You have to wake up in the morning and go, "Man, I can't wait to see the lead intelligence." Versus, "I can't wait to sell somebody something." It's like, it's about being intimate, and not in a weird way by the way, but intimate with the people that you're actually helping. Again, I go back to it's like human over lead, right? I hate, even though I use it, I hate prospect leads and customers. I understand what we're doing when we say that, but if you think about it's humans, and how much do I know about these humans, and how much am I paying attention to what these humans still might need. That's real value. So the CRM in itself I think has to be mentioned in this section.

Remington Begg:
Yeah. And to that point, there's going to be a lot of salespeople, and I'm putting people in a bucket because I run into many of them, and if this isn't you, then you don't have to worry. But there's a lot of them that are so focused on turning and burning, only looking at numbers and only thinking about numbers that have asked me, when we do trainings, like, "Oh, you know what? Is there an easier way to see all the pages they've viewed?" Or, "Is there an easier way to see what form submissions they've done?" It's like, come on, right? Do a little bit of homework. You expect your prospect to do homework on you and do things that you want and you're not willing to spend a couple of minutes to make sure you have an engaging conversation. Now, that might go to the quality of salesperson, but it's needed in the tool for you to look at the timeframe of those actions as much as the list of pages viewed.

George:
Yeah.

Remington Begg:
But that being said, you can't create lists of people who have viewed pages and stuff like that.

George:
Sure.

Remington Begg:
So one of the, a couple of the fields that work really well in filters is last activity date. The reason why I love this one is it's only a sales metric. So we've used it like this for a couple of clients. We have a client, we've got a boatload of leads and they've got a boatload of leads that didn't get touched by sales salesperson because the salesperson feels that referrals are better than website leads. Now, referrals are amazing, but I'd be willing to bet that direct traffic that's coming to your website could also be referrals. Just because they came from the website and historically your website sucked doesn't mean that moving forward those said leads are going to suck, and so what we've done and what you can do is if you're trying to get people to jump in and actually pay attention, is you can set lead routing. So automatically go.

Remington Begg:
Now, to do lead routing for round-robin or anything like that, you need Sales Pro, Sales Hub or above for any of the paid seats. You can route to those individuals and then you can say, "My expectation is that you will do something within the next blank." It could be a period of time. In this case for this client it was three business days, which in my opinion I think is too long, but that's another podcast. But you can take that, and say if no activity has been logged, the latest activity has been logged in a three day delay. You can make it re round-robin to someone else automatically using the automation that workflow. Two things just happen. Holy crap, I need to make sure that I do something in the CRM. We got them in the CRM, and number two is hopefully they actually follow up and reach out, right? Now you've got that engagement, but the biggest and best part of it is it solves for the prospect, because the prospect reached out and now it's ensuring that someone else is going to pick that up and to take it where it needs to go. So those kinds of automation and using some of those fields and comparing fields like that are super, super important. Sorry, I just got in a soapbox.

George:
I love it. Listen, Sprocket Talk, viewers and listeners, well not listeners because it's only on sprockettalk.com, so go get your free VIP and then you can watch this at a later date if you're watching it and you aren't a member of sprockettalk.com. Remington, I do want to go very micro for a second, and again, I'm going to talk about a tool that nobody really ever talks about being a tool for sales in HubSpot. So, and that is under profile, your email signature.

Remington Begg:
Yeah.

George:
I can't tell you how many portals for how many people that we talk to them, ask them, look at and say, "Do you have your signature in there?" And they say, "No." And then if you do, it's literally their name and it's just some plain text, and the fact that you can build an HTML or get somebody to build an HTML signature for you is very powerful, but even in the default editor, are you using your email signature to the best of its ability? Do you have some type of link to a who you are video? Do you have your meeting link in your signature? Do you have a link to your latest piece of content to present yourself as a thought leader?

George:
The list is endless, but are you using your signature inside of the CRM so that you don't feel like you have to jump out to your Gmail or your Outlook because that's where your signature lives, but you can say, "Hey, I could stay in this CRM all day." Because when I email them right from the CRM, I've got this dope email signature that is helping people understand who I am, what I do, how I help them, and how I know everything there is to know, and I'm talking about you, not me right now, around my industry, or product, or service. Think about it right now. Do you have that in place in your CRM? If not, go to your profile, go to signature, and start building that stuff out today.

Remington Begg:
So another reason is because marketing can use that signature. So if we're talking about how these signatures can, if we're talking about breaking down the barriers, you can be in control of how people follow up. Maybe it's that meeting link which I'm about to jump into, or maybe it's how you want your name mentioned, right? Marketing. If marketing has to manually put that in, or the marketing individual on your team has to manually put it in, it's only ever going to be one thing. So if you get married, you get unmarried, something changes to your name, you get a PhD at the end, whatever, right? You would be able to have control of that signature and it's available for marketers as a merge tag that they could use in emails so that they could start communicating on your behalf, which is really, really incredible, but meetings is where I'm going.

Remington Begg:
A lot of people that use, and this is a free tool, you can have a meeting link. You can also have a team meeting link, which I'll get into in a second, but I don't know how many portals I jump into. They have one or two per person, right? We've got, I've got seven right now, and one of them is as specific as a specific client, right? Because I want to make sure that that client has wider availability than general, right? So you could be working on a lot of this and what's really cool when you actually go to the meetings link page, is you get to see the conversion rates of that meeting link. So I know my general one is converting at 62.6%, right? 129 meetings booked through that meeting link. That's a really great engagement, but I also know that some of them, which I would expect it would be a little bit higher are lower.

Remington Begg:
So why I'm bringing that up is you've got things based on your availability. Then there are some settings within the meeting links to adjust availability. Your availability has to tie into your consumer or your customer's availability. So if you see low conversion rates on there, it might not be the questions you're asking, it might just be that it's not available this week, or you need to adjust that around. So keep an eye on that. Then the team one is really important because you can make a team. So George and I, we've got different calendars, but we have a meeting link.

George:
Yeah, we do.

Remington Begg:
But we've got a meeting link that if we want to jump on a call that couldn't connect all of our meeting or our availability together, you can make that happen. You can also make it so that the round-robins between George or Remington with one meeting link. So depending on how your sales operates and that kind of thing, those meeting links are super, super valuable and you can use that in a lot of your automation that you do, or in a lot of booking and setting meetings, but beware sometimes you can come across impersonal. So I'm actually speaking at INBOUND about how you can improve that.

George:
Oh, snap. So I love that you brought that one up because I also feel like people need to realize that meeting links can come and go, right? So I created a meeting link for INBOUD Speaks, the video series to get people, speakers to schedule. Now it's over so that link is gone. I also liked the fact Remington, so for instance, Spedifort, they had to go, but they said, "Have a nice day. Greetings from Austria." Now, imagine if you just have a general meeting link, but you do business on both sides of the pond. It's going to look very not specific to them, very uncontextualized because there's going to be a whole lot of American timeframes and they're going to have to pick and choose, but imagine if you had a link for people who were in America or this general time zone, and then folks who were like Australia, Austria, wherever, and then that was like, "Oh, well this is, this feels more like it's actually for me. These are some times that will work." But all of those things, the reason you have seven, Remington, I think I have six maybe, seven maybe, I don't know. I delete and add at different times.

George:
The reason though that you have those is because of a very important thing that I think as a sales tool that isn't in HubSpot, and that's the ability to have foresight into the type of meetings that you're going to have to have and the type of people that you're going to have to talk to. If you sit down and really think about what does that matrix look like, you're quickly going to come up with four, five, six seven, eight, 10, 12 meeting links that you want to divvy out for different people at different times. So I love that.

George:
Remington, we got one more minute. I can't go off of this episode without talking about snippets. Here's the deal. Time is precious. Time is precious. Look, we're all trying to squeeze the most amount of time that we can get out of our day, and if I don't have to write another 10, 50, or up to 500 characters, and I can just get something to automate it by hitting a little pound sign, that's the hashtag for all you young bucks. If I can hit the hashtag and a couple of letters and boom I got a paragraph or two out there, or I can do a hashtag and all of a sudden it gives me a drop-down for a list of things that I want to talk about in that call because I'm using it in notes or a thing that I want to say because I'm using it in email, or a piece of information because I'm using in chat. In other words, I'm telling the story of if you set up those snippets, and again you have the foresight to think about, I need these in my notes, I need these in my emails, I need these one as the chat bot, as a sales professional, you're going to have an arsenal of conversational micro tools that you can throw around and use and save yourself a ton of time.

George:
Here's the other part about this. If you're a sales manager and you're just freaking out about voice, aka brand consistency, snippets is a way to reign that bad boy in with a quickness where you're like look, when we're talking about this, there's a snippet. When you needed to teach somebody about this, here's a snippet. If you need to share this piece of content, here's a snippet, and you know things are being said in the way that the company wants them to be said, versus that feeling like the conversational Wild Wild West, because that's no good place.

Remington Begg:
Yup, and you said chat, and I can't believe it took me to one minute past the time that we're done. Chat, and chat is something that I don't think people are prepared for how effective it could be. I'm going to say that again. I don't think people, meaning sales people or managers, are prepared for how effective chat can be, especially in the sales process.

George:
Yep.

Remington Begg:
Because I talk to a lot of people about chat and about conversational marketing and hell, even the term conversational marketing, right? I added in and sales to my presentation. But the sales side of conversations is what most salespeople that are seasoned are going to tell you, like, "I have conversations every day." Well, your customers and prospects are having it on your website, and so you think about being more accessible, right? But we immediately go to oh, I'm measured on the number of calls that I've got. Well, there's a cultural shift that has to change. How about like meaningful interactions? Our buddy Doug Davidoff talks about that all the time on his podcast, but make it so it's a chat equals a phone call.

George:
Right, right.

Remington Begg:
You know? Because you could have that, you could have someone sign up and you could give them a link to actually sign up for quotes, which is something we'll just have to talk on another day, and literally they could sign without even talking to a human being in real life, you know what I mean? It could just all be done in chat. So don't discount chat because it's scary and leverage the tool. Hell, that one's free as well. So you get the CRM and you've got chat or conversations.

George:
Yep.

Remington Begg:
There's a whole bunch in that sales stack. We haven't touched the surface.

George:
I mean, and Remington, I mean, and let's keep it real. Nobody wants to talk on the damn phone anyway anymore.

Remington Begg:
Right.

George:
That's why we text everybody. Yeah. There's a text here, a text there. I get more Facebook Messenger notifications and text notifications. You know who calls me? The bill collectors. That's who calls me. Nobody else calls me. They all text me, which is dumb, because here's the deal. If you're a sales rep and you're like, "Well, I just call all day every day. 27 calls." You know? No, nobody wants to call.

Remington Begg:
You inspired another one. You talked about tasks, the automatic followup task reminders that can happen. You want to follow up with these people in three days? For the love of all that is holy, if we spend several dollars getting a lead, or several hundreds of dollars getting a lead, don't call them once and then never call them back because they didn't answer. If my friends and family did that, they called me and I didn't answer and that's the only time they ever talked to me, I'll be a very lonely guy.

George:
Well, I wouldn't talk to many people, that's for sure, because I really never answered the phone unless I see that it's Remington Begg and my wife.

Remington Begg:
There you go, there you go.

George:
Then I answered the phone. Those are the two times. All right, well we should probably wrap this up. We're about four minutes over. Listen, if you're watching this, make sure you head over to sprockettalk.com, get your free VIP membership. If you're watching this and you're part of the membership, then make sure you hit us up with any questions you might have about the HubSpot tools as well as what you would love to see us do an episode of Unpacked on, and again, I can't wait to do this Remington at INBOUND live. It's going to be super exciting. But any parting words before we cut this thing off?

Remington Begg:
See you all at INBOUND.

George:
Awesome.

Remington Begg:
It's going to be fun.

George:
Yeah, it is. Remember to be a happy, helpful, humble human, and along the way, do some happy HubSpoting.

Remington Begg:
Toodles.